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Okay, so that IS them, under the orange cover. Well done!
Yay! Now maybe someone in the future will repair some frozen contactors and update us on what they did. If mine ever hang up and I can't force them with hard reboots and AlphaOBD then I may feel bold enough to dig in and try to get hands on with them. It may be way easier to repair/replace them than we are led to believe.
 

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It may be way easier to repair/replace them than we are led to believe.
I suppose it depends on what you call "easy", since at a bare minimum you have to drop the rear axle, drain the coolant, drop the 600-pound pack, remove the lid, & try not to kill yourself with 400 volts direct current.

So I'm still going to do this, when convenient: Save Your Irreplaceable Contactors! "Clunk, clunk...
 

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I suppose it depends on what you call "easy", since at a bare minimum you have to drop the rear axle, drain the coolant, drop the 600-pound pack, remove the lid, & try not to kill yourself with 400 volts direct current.

So I'm still going to do this, when convenient: Save Your Irreplaceable Contactors! "Clunk, clunk...
Fair enough. "easy" is a very relative word and this would require some assistance from a friend that is well versed handling high voltage. Definitely a PITA to get to them, but I guess what I meant is that after getting to them, they appear to be non-proprietary components (solenoids maybe?), that could possibly be removed and cleaned or lubricated.

I was mainly contrasting this to one of the computer/logic boards being much more when it fails it's down for the count. Maybe I'm being overly optimistic, but I'm hoping that I can get 200k out of this thing with a little wrenching, leaning on forums, and maybe getting advice from a friendly engineer or two. I'm fearful that new OEM parts may not keep me going that long if availability dries up, but with some luck, maybe we will be able to solve some of the less complex issues (contactors, electrical shorts, etc).

Thank you for the link btw, I am saving that. Preventative maintenance is way easier than tearing things apart to see what broke maintenance.
 

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@vladifresh Hello, I'm excited that you had luck bringing your battery pack back from the dead and thanks for documenting it. I'm dropping the pack in my dead 500e next week. Can you tell me more about the charging process for each module. I watched a video that said some modules have 5 cells and others have 6 cells, each at 3.7 volts, so I'm guessing I need to be able to charge to 18.5 and 22.2 Volts, respectively. For the 22.2 Volt, 6 cell packs, I'm guessing, this is where you used the scooter 24V charger? It seems I can also buy a 18V charger. Are there any other details that may be helpful? I'm guessing I will just pop the cover on the battery pack, charge each module without killing myself and then put it back together? Thank you!
 

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Well, I got around to dropping the battery pack and attempted charging one of the six cell modules. Initial voltage reading was 0.4V, so that was not good, it came up to around 1.6V or so and leveled off when charging with a 24V 1.5A scooter charger. Maybe I need higher amp charger? I've only looked at one module. I plan to check on the others today. Here's a video of the process of dropping the battery and looking inside if you are curious of how this is done.

 

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Can you access the individual cells in the modules? ... enough to attach alligator clamps, a bare copper wire wedged between contacts, or a small male connector? I looked at a module disassembly video here-
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I'm not familiar with the chemistry of these cells exactly, nor their capacities. But I would not be comfortable charging a fully discharged 18-24v module at 1amp - without more information:

at minimum, as well as the typical disclaimers you might hear about fire danger and attempting something like this away from buildings, I think you may want to monitor cell temperatures and watch for any individual cells that don't take a charge - those you should try charging individually (starting at very low amps). I think there may be some (potential) danger of a cell near zero volts reversing polarity or more commonly a shorted cell
- or otherwise some cells going over voltage while other bad cells in the module stay near zero.

Some bad cells will show right away. Some cells will take a charge then drain slowly - those are something to watch out for.

I think your best chance (from deeply discharged) is if you start at very very low amperage, something like .1- .2 amps and work up from there, I wouldn't personally feel comfortable in the 1a or higher ballpark until all cells in the module are in the above 2v range.

You can probably use something like imax b6 hobby charger/s if you can get access to all the individual cells. You could also invest in a cheap 5-6s balance board to get cell voltages all relatively equal before you (eventually) turn it over to the factory bms again at ~3.x volts per cell. A dedicated balance board works much faster than a cheap balance charger.

You might get away with just the scooter charger if you can keep an eye on the individual cell voltages with a multimeter... An adjustable "lab" dc power supply (cc-cv) would be a much better idea if you insist on charging by module
 

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Well, I got around to dropping the battery pack and attempted charging one of the six cell modules. Initial voltage reading was 0.4V, so that was not good, it came up to around 1.6V or so and leveled off when charging with a 24V 1.5A scooter charger. Maybe I need higher amp charger? I've only looked at one module. I plan to check on the others today. Here's a video of the process of dropping the battery and looking inside if you are curious of how this is done.

I am curious, did it work? Did you make a second video?
 
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