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Forget what anyone says, gas prices will always be on the rise. We might be getting a break at the fuel pumps right now but it's only going to last so long. Depending on what type of vehicle you drive if it's a fuel efficient compact car or a gas guzzling V8 chances are your looking to save fuel.

Since we cannot improve the MPG we get from our cars, no automotive additive or engine modification said to get you better gas mileage will help, face it. The below fuel saving tips are probably as much you can do to save fuel other than getting a more vehicle with better miles per gallon.

If you’re like most Americans, chances are good you’re heading out on the roads over the Memorial Day weekend. Oddly enough, gas prices seem to be coming down instead of taking their usual skyward trend on the first weekend of the summer vacation season. That may be a good sign, but gas is still **** expensive; in fact, it’s doubled in price since 2009, and I’d be willing to bet that most of our incomes haven’t kept pace. Short of trading in your current ride for something more fuel efficient, what can you do to reduce your gas bill as much as possible? Below are five tips that can save you money at the pump.


Tune Up Your Car

A properly tuned car gets better fuel economy than one with spent spark plugs and a dirty air filter. Checking your air filter should take you less than 10 minutes, and if you can’t remember the last time you replaced it you’re probably overdue. Ditto for spark plugs; the manufacturer may claim that they’ll last for 60,000 miles, but that doesn’t mean that they’ll work optimally towards the end of their life. Also, keep an eye on any dramatic changes to your car’s fuel economy. Increased fuel consumption could be something as simple as a stuck thermostat, which is (usually) easy and inexpensive to repair.


Use A/C On The Highway, Not Around Town

Above 45 miles per hour or so (depending on the car), it’s more efficient to use your car’s air conditioning system than it is to drive with the windows open, thanks to wind resistance caused by the open windows. Below 40 miles per hour, drag is reduced and it’s more fuel efficient to drive with the windows down. Also, realize that electrical draw uses fuel since the alternator is powered from the engine. The less accessories you have on, the better your fuel economy will be (although, admittedly, we’re probably talking about a few more feet per gallon, not miles per gallon).


Squeeze The Throttle And Brakes

If you take a high-performance driving school, one of the first things you’ll learn is “squeeze the throttle and brakes”. Mashing the pedals causes abrupt changes in vehicle stability at speed, and that’s rarely a good thing on a racetrack. It’s not a good thing on the roads, either, since you’ll get the best fuel economy by accelerating slowly, coasting when you can and braking gently, well in advance of stopped traffic. Just like racing a Mazda Miata, getting good gas mileage is all about preserving momentum.


Lighten Up

How much crap do you carry around in your car that you don’t really need? That D-cell Maglight that you keep under your seat for protection won’t help if you run into a guy who knows how to fight, so you might as well replace it with something lighter. Do you need to carry a quart of oil in your trunk, or that lug wrench that you haven’t used in five years? Not only is a lighter car better on gas, but it’s also faster, so you can think of cleaning out your car as getting free horsepower.


Use The Correct Grade Of Gasoline

If your car requires premium gas, or even recommends it, you’ll get better fuel economy (and better performance) by using premium over regular. Will it offset the difference in price between regular gas and premium gas? I can’t say, because the cost savings is likely to be car dependent. I look at it this way: the engineers who built your engine had specific performance goals in mind, and achieving them requires a particular grade of gas. If you can’t afford to put premium gas in the tank, then you shouldn’t buy a car that requires it.

Also, feel free to ignore the myths about only buying gasoline in the morning, when temperatures are cooler. Gasoline is kept in underground storage tanks, which maintain a relatively constant temperature throughout the day. Fill up when you need gas, but I’d still bypass a station getting a fuel delivery. I know most pumps use filters, but why run the risk of getting fuel-filter-clogging sediment in your tank if you can avoid it?

http://www.ridelust.com/five-tips-to-save-you-gas/
 

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Great fuel saving tips here.

For a few months now I have been doing all I can to get better MPG's from my vehicle and it's working.

It's all the little things that add up in the end for better fuel economy and gas mileage.

Washing your vehicle and keeping it clean (which you should with regular vehicle maintenance) helps with getting better mileage. It's been proven many times a clean car gets better gas mileage than a dirty car.
 

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A couple of years ago, when gas shot way up for a few months, I drastically changed my driving habits. Mainly, I stopped driving 75mph-80mph and kept my max speed at 65mph.

What I found was that over my 50-mile, mostly interstate, commute, because of slow spots and traffic, I didn't get to work any faster by driving 80mph than I did by driving 65mph. I was able to stretch a fill-up from every three days to every four days, on average, just doing that.

So now, if you ever wonder why, in several posts I have on here, I've mentioned that I don't drive over 65mph, that's why.

Ryan
 

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The main reason I purchased my Fiat was for gas mileage. I am not a major fan of hybrid technology and let’s face it the 500 package is pretty awesome. I purchased mine on July 12th and I have already put 2,000 miles on the car. I do a lot of highway driving. So far the car's overall average on gas is 37.3 MPG. The best tank I have had was 42.7 miles per gallon and the worst was 36.4 miles per gallon.

In the last three weeks I have tried many different things. I always drive with the instant fuel economy display on. I have tried long distance travel to and from work at 55, 60, 65 and 70 miles per hour. Right now I am keeping the car at about 63 mph. I also pay attention to how the fuel economy changes on both highway and city drives. It is interesting there is almost always a way to make my mileage better. Today my tank average is 40.2.
 

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Hi

In general I try to shift at the speeds recommended in the manual "for good efficiency", I keep the EVIC display on Instantaneous Efficiency, and just try to do stuff all my shifting and stuff as smoothly as I can.

Regards

Pat
 

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let me say that I did NOT buy my 500 for the fuel mileage. BUT I do like to play with it.

I drive mine with the 'instant mpg' display ON so I can monitor when I'm using the most gas and how to adjust my driving. I've notice that with the display ON my average MPG's have been 34-36 and with it OFF, I drop down to about 31-32 on average.

I kind of disagree with the 'accelerating slowly' theory. I find that if I accelerate quickly, say to 40 mph in a relatively short timespan, that allows me to travel at 40 mph getting 45+mpgs much sooner than if I had accelerated slowly. one must factor both time as well as distance.

works for me anyway.......:)
 

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Great thread!

The only pointer I found odd is the lug wrench comment. If I bought the spare tire kit, which I did not, I'd want the respective tools onboard. The car is already heavier with the spare mounted, right?

Everything else here is solid.

I also drove with eco Drive for a month (taking notes) and monitor my driving with Instant Economy. These are very useful tools.
 

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City/ highway. My average is around 33-34 mpgs, with a loaded 500 too. Straight highway speeds at 65 mpg, I can get over 40 mpgs. You can watch the gas milage go down, the higher the speed. No way I'm going to drive a car, in 100 and above temps, with no AC. This kind of spring weather, I love my sunroof. Not the pollen.
 

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I have heard that it is best to fill up early in the morning or at late night when the temps are cool. something to do with gasoline expanding at higher temps. Sounds reasonable.
 

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^^^exactly. The best way to get stellar mileage is "DON'T DRIVE"
Yep, plan your time out and routes efficiently. Drive as little as possible.
The less time we spend in the car, the more we save.
The more we can sit on the forum....

Driving the 500 is fun, but burning gas is burning money.
 

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Even without trying to achieve good gas mileage, this car is very good. I've averaged 27 mpg over 13k miles of ownership. This experience has entailed spirited driving as much as possible. With that in mind, I think that 27 mpg is outstanding. Love this car, and the mpg is excellent.
Keep in mind I reset Trip A when we filled up, then we drove awhile to and from the Dragon and did up and back and when I parked at the hotel... 30.3 MPG! Not bad, I get saving money and I think it is a great idea but many of us bought these cars for the simple fact that you can drive "spirited" and still get pretty decent results without breaking the bank. :D

Ecomodder I found before I joined this forum and found it to be a wealth of information.
 
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