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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few days ago my 2012 FIAT 500 Sport with 66,000 miles displayed the "low oil pressure, turn engine off" message. Prior to this moment, the engine was running without issue and without any advanced warning lights or messages. As I was committed to crossing a four-lane road, I attempted to proceed just through the intersection; the engine had a complete loss of power and shut off on its own less than a third of the way across. Whatever happened is likely catastrophic as it occurred suddenly and without warning.

After having my car towed to my home, I scanned for fault codes and found none. A week prior, I did clear a P1D7F (ETC Self-learning failure) and a P0564-00 (Speed control switch) code. I am not sure if these are related.

Hopeful that my engine is not ruined, I performed the following:
  • Oil and filter change (Oil was more than 1 quart low but the dipstick showed otherwise)
  • New PCV valve and AOS o-ring
  • New battery (I was running a Braille 11-pound racing battery and was concerned it may have been a cause of prior fault codes)
Upon attempted start-up, the engine turned over but with a sound of no compression. I heard a thump-thump-thump from the exhaust, but repeated attempts to cycle oil to the Multi-air system did not produce a change. Examination of the oil filter showed no signs of oil reaching it. I am thinking that I have a failed oil pump, a blocked oil pickup tube, or something worse. My next step is to remove the oil pan to hopefully not find slivers of what used to be my crankshaft bearings. I'm prepared for the worst. In hindsight, cranking the engine after the oil change was not a wise idea.

If you have any insight or condolences to offer, I would appreciate it. Thanks. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
UPDATE:
The sudden loss of oil pressure was the result of a broken gear (gerotor) in the oil pump.

As soon as I can get my hands on a crankshaft bolt, I can put my 500 back together and see if it now builds oil pressure.
 

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I have the same year 2012 Fiat 500 sport with 94000km I am wanting to fix myself but apparently need a crankshaft/camshaft timing holding tool kit. Did you purchase and do the work yourself, if so what is the part number to buy this tool kit. I have tried everything after the oil pressure sensor light stalled my car and had it towed to my home. Warranty in canada for the drivetrain is 5 years or 100,000km so I am out of luck and the dealer wants approx 1800 plus tax to replace the oil pump if its that, they told me. Were you able to fix it on your own with no issues and did the pump replacement solve your problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is the exact tool that I purchased via Amazon.
Engine Timing Tool Set Compatible with Alfa/Lancia Delta/Romeo/Fiat Multiair 1.4 Engine https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RGF9C21/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_MMEVXC54RCHFJ9DQ2AKT

I did the work myself which was not terribly difficult, but the crankshaft bolt was very difficult to remove. I ended up rounding the head to the point where all I could do was cut the flange of the bolt to release tension and remove it. Finding a replacement bolt was not easy.

The engine runs quite well, oil pressure is good, but I do get the occasional “solenoid timing out of range” code. I’ll continue to drive it until the engine gives out and then I’ll decide what to do at that point.
 

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Thanks very much for your reply and input. I have created a case complaint with Fiat Canada with regards to getting some cost relief and I was told that I would need to bring it back to the dealer where I bought the car from and since I am the original owner, if the dealer mechanics determine the oil pump failed due to manufacturing defect they will investigate but no promise for resolution. For now I decided to tow the car there and let them diagnose for a cost of 160.
 

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This is the exact tool that I purchased via Amazon.
Engine Timing Tool Set Compatible with Alfa/Lancia Delta/Romeo/Fiat Multiair 1.4 Engine https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RGF9C21/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_MMEVXC54RCHFJ9DQ2AKT

I did the work myself which was not terribly difficult, but the crankshaft bolt was very difficult to remove. I ended up rounding the head to the point where all I could do was cut the flange of the bolt to release tension and remove it. Finding a replacement bolt was not easy.

The engine runs quite well, oil pressure is good, but I do get the occasional “solenoid timing out of range” code. I’ll continue to drive it until the engine gives out and then I’ll decide what to do at that point.
 

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Hi, so I had the service advisor tell now they need another 3 hours labour after spending 1 hour with no results.
He told me I will probably need a short block because if the oil pump failed it more likely damaged the bearings and further more I am looking at about 3000 dollars. I'm very upset so I told him not to do any further work. I rather try fixing as you did. I wanted to know if you had to pull the engine out to do the repair yourself. That is what they are telling me that is required to change the oil pump alone. Do I need any gaskets to reassemble. I just want to prepare all that I really need just to get this job done myself with the help of my buddy. I had no sign of engine issues before this oil pressure light stopped my engine. I still believe it is the same issue as you had with a failed oil pump. Could I have damaged the crankshaft when I was trying to turn my engine over for excessive tries trying to troubleshoot what went wrong? I did not drive at all because I could not restart it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do I need any gaskets to reassemble?
That’s certainly not the news you wanted, but I’m not surprised. I’m no expert, but with an oil pump failure, it’s highly likely that a new engine will be in your future. Once the oil pressure drops to zero, it doesn’t take much to damage the crankshaft bearings. It’s unlikely that the crankshaft itself is damaged.

Since you’re going to have to drop the oil pan, you might as well inspect the rod bearings — at least. That’s what I did. Keep in mind that the connecting rod bolts are torque-to-yield, so they should not be reused once removed. You’ll want to order a set before diving in. I ordered a set and there were only 7, so I had to reuse one. Not ideal, but not the end of the world either; I didn’t have time to wait on another set. My rod bearings looked perfectly fine, but I wish I would have checked the main bearings too. The problem is that I felt it was too dodgy to remove the crankshaft cradle with the engine in the car and me laying beneath it. If I had a helper, I may have done it and considered it a “mini” lower end rebuild. Bearings are cheap, maybe consider replacing them while you’re in there.

The only gasket you’ll replace comes with the new oil pump. I ordered the Melling instead of the more expensive Mopar version since they are the same and are both made in the USA by Melling. The other gaskets are made from RTV, this goes for RTV used for the oil pump installation and the oil pan. Be sure to follow the official shop manual closely for where the sealant goes. I missed a step and ended up with a leak that wasn’t hard to fix, but it was a pain to do so. Also, there is a recommended Mopar RTV sealant that must be used. I didn’t use that, but haven’t had issues with the stuff I used.
 

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So, I started disassembly without a manual. I managed to get the pan down enough to unbolt the suction tube and remove it out of the way. I could not get enough clearance to slide out the pan because it hits the exhaust pipe. I looked up the hole with a flashlight and seen the broken tooth. Poked at it with a thin screwdriver and it fell out. Did you have to unbolt drop the exhaust pipe manifold? I did see on youtube that a guy managed to remove without dropping the exhaust pipe. How did you manage to get your pan out?
I too am ordering the Melling pump from RockAuto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I looked up the hole with a flashlight and seen the broken tooth. Poked at it with a thin screwdriver and it fell out. Did you have to unbolt drop the exhaust pipe manifold? I did see on youtube that a guy managed to remove without dropping the exhaust pipe. How did you manage to get your pan out?
What you found sounds similar to what I found. The gerotor gear in my oil pump had cracked all the way through on one side.
I think I saw the video you’re referring to, and if so, the 500 was European with a steel oil pan. I tried unsuccessfully to drop my alloy pan without removing the exhaust, but there is no room to do so. But if there was, reinstalling it without breaking up the sealant bead would be virtually impossible anyway.
If you have a turbo version, removing the dow pipe and cat is less invasive, but on the NA version, you have to unbolt the exhaust manifold from the engine and remove the entire unit up to the flex pipe.
Some people claim that you can snake the assembly downward, but I didn’t have ample clearance between the radiator and the engine to do so. I ended up removing the radiator and fan, and carefully swung the condenser coil out of the way and propped it up with a jack stand. If you get the radiator and coil out of the way, unbolting and removing the exhaust header is much easier.

The job isn’t hard, but it is really involved and makes it easy to understand why the shop charges what they do.
 
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