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When I shopped HARD for the best value new L2 in 2015, Juicebox was the clear winner (less cost for more power). It looks like they're still one of the best values. Their bottom-of-the-line model that my friend got in 2015 is still going strong after 3 years of daily use for ALL of her 500e charging, & now ALL of her Tesla 3 charging.
 

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HOWEVER, from a 240V outlet (required for L2), for only $20 you can get nearly half the charging speed as a $300+ L2 charger, just by plugging the stock charge-cord in with an adapter.

This kind of option looks good, but I'm going to have to have a 240V outlet installed, so I expect that to be the bulk of the cost I'll spend on a Level 2 charger.

The main reason I want a fixed charger at home is so I don't have to keep setting up the included EVSE every other night. :sneaky: Charging near where I work is just so nice to connect the cable and then put it back when I leave. I'd also like to have the Telsa destination/home charger adapter that the previous poster resurrected this thread with, but I have been so focused on the cost-savings with this car that I haven't been able to justify any $200+ purchases, since I haven't needed a second EVSE or other adapters yet.

Either way, I expect to be cruising eBay this year for a sub-$400 JuiceBox Pro 40, since that sounds like a good option for the 500e and whatever next EV we end up getting to replace the other car in a few years.
 

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The main reason I want a fixed charger at home is so I don't have to keep setting up the included EVSE every other night. :sneaky: Charging near where I work is just so nice to connect the cable and then put it back when I leave.
At home with the stock charge-cord I just connect the cable and then put it back when I leave.

I leave my stock charge-cord plugged in at home, at least when I'm confident I can charge somewhere along my route &/or when I know I can make it back home without even charging at all.
 

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When I shopped HARD for the best value new L2 in 2015, Juicebox was the clear winner (less cost for more power). It looks like they're still one of the best values. Their bottom-of-the-line model that my friend got in 2015 is still going strong after 3 years of daily use for ALL of her 500e charging, & now ALL of her Tesla 3 charging.
I liked my Juicebox when it worked. Out of warranty is a boat anchor if it breaks. They won't sell parts(particularly the MOBO) for the older models. The latest models I think they are actually fully supported.

I like my OpenEVSEs, while they aren't without issues. Its an easy DIY kit and I like being able to replace parts when the time arises. The only issue I've had is the wifi set up, its an odd web based app, that sometimes has connection issues. But I think the issue has more to do with connecting to my mesh wifi, the arduino wifi dongles in the OpenEVSE.
 

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We have 50A exterior outlet so I immediately tried 30A $300 EVSE. Charged quick but screwed with the Fiat scheduled charging. Search my posts about it for more detail. Short story it went back.

I learned about the 240V plug hack with the OEM EVSE and it behaves beautifully using OEM scheduling. [email protected] = 2.8kW which seems to be plenty for our 6 hour weekday super low tier window.

Because I’m not entirely certain what causes the incompatibility regarding Scheduled Charge and aftermarket EVSE I’m sticking with OEM. In fact, ‘picked up another used one for about $150 eBay.
 

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I just purchased a Chargepoint Home Flex a couple of weeks ago and installed it last week because my local utility company offered, starting Jan 1, 2020, a $500 rebate for purchasing a Chargepoint EVSE and connecting them to the data collection database.

Now I stumbled upon the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit which looks like it has been extended to the end of 2020. So do I simply save my receipts for the EVSE and any wiring and subpanel costs, and complete the proper tax form to get the tax credit? It looks like it is 30% of the cost up to $1,000.

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit

Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit
NOTE: This incentive originally expired on December 31, 2016, but was retroactively extended through December 31, 2020, by Public Law 116-94.

Fueling equipment for natural gas, propane, liquefied hydrogen, electricity, E85, or diesel fuel blends containing a minimum of 20% biodiesel installed through December 31, 2020, is eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost, not to exceed $30,000. Permitting and inspection fees are not included in covered expenses. Fueling station owners who install qualified equipment at multiple sites are allowed to use the credit towards each location. Consumers who purchased qualified residential fueling equipment prior to December 31, 2020, may receive a tax credit of up to $1,000. Unused credits that qualify as general business tax credits, as defined by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), may be carried backward one year and carried forward 20 years. For more information about claiming the credit, see IRS Form 8911, which is available on the IRS Forms and Publications website. (Reference Public Law 116-94, Public Law 115-123, Public Law 114-113, 26 U.S. Code 30C and 38, and IRS Notice 2007-43(PDF))

Point of Contact
U.S. Internal Revenue Service
Phone: (800) 829-1040
Internal Revenue Service | An official website of the United States government
 

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Chargepoint Flex (an overall decent L2) has the feature of "connecting" your account to a utility or another organization and sharing some usage data and / or controls. So there are utilities which are happy to control your amperage in peak times to better balance their networks, or simply private organizations who want to resell your power usage as carbon tax credit to other companies. In return you can get significant rebates, or even the full price reimbursement.

So I'd say it might be a good idea to check the available rebates and consider them in the decision.
 

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OpenEVSE says their chargers have "Tools to integrate charging station with home automation and energy monitoring", so that may qualify for rebates too. I think JuiceBox does, AND...:

I liked my Juicebox when it worked. Out of warranty is a boat anchor if it breaks. They won't sell parts(particularly the MOBO) for the older models... I like my OpenEVSEs... Its an easy DIY kit and I like being able to replace parts when the time arises.
Ignoring rebates but not ignoring RostHaus, I would probably now go with OpenEVSE, since they're now a much better value than Juicebox. Open's sales pages aren't perfect, but they replied at 10:30 on a Saturday(!) with current pricing:

$469 Open 40A KIT ("basic tools only, no soldering or crimping". The "ikea" of chargers?).
$499 Open 40A (or 48A KIT).
$549 Open 48A.
$569 JuiceBox 32A.
$599 ChargePoint 32A.
$699 ChargePoint 50A.

Note that 30A will max out a 500e, 32A will max out an eGolf, & I think at least some Model3s, but it can be nice to have more power, in case you end up with another EV with a faster onboard charger.
 

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OpenEVSE says their chargers have "Tools to integrate charging station with home automation and energy monitoring", so that may qualify for rebates too. I think JuiceBox does, AND...:



Ignoring rebates but not ignoring RostHaus, I would probably now go with OpenEVSE, since they're now a much better value than Juicebox. Open's sales pages aren't perfect, but they replied at 10:30 on a Saturday(!) with current pricing:

$469 Open 40A KIT ("basic tools only, no soldering or crimping". The "ikea" of chargers?).
$499 Open 40A (or 48A KIT).
$549 Open 48A.
$569 JuiceBox 32A.
$599 ChargePoint 32A.
$699 ChargePoint 50A.

Note that 30A will max out a 500e, 32A will max out an eGolf, & I think at least some Model3s, but it can be nice to have more power, in case you end up with another EV with a faster onboard charger.

I don't know if the home automation works well, outside the webapp, my models are from last august and they did not have any alexa or google support back then.
The software updating requires a usb cable I didn't purchase.

The energy monitoring apps do work and will even connect up with some utilities companies.
The supported utilities offer some sort of rebate program for using the charger offpeak. I'm not in an area that is part of the program.

Couple notes if you build your own:
- Don't buy their box, its extremely cramped. the gauge required to supply 40a barely fits. And on the output side the most frustrating part is getting the coils on. They spec'd a gfci that barely fits over the wiring that I used for a proper 40a output. Their EVSE cabling may be smaller, but the gfci and current coil barely fit in the box as is.
Its an off the shelf box anyhow and I tracked down the company that supplies their boxes; and when I built the second open evse I used a larger box. It went together much quicker with the second box. If anyone wants the part number I can post it.

-Software, They have 2 types, OpenEVSE and GoPlug. I for some reason got 1 of each. The Goplug is a simplified version of OpenEVSE, but will connect up and share data with some utility companies as I mentioned above. The Wifi instructions are very bad and if you've never worked with an arduino, it may be a bit of a learning curve to set up. That said, you do not need to set up anything with a computer, if you aren't using wifi.

I think I spent about $450 for 2 DIY 40a kits without J1772 cables.
In all I spent just under $1000, because I had to run 2 new 50a lines to my garage and I built my own 25 ft J1772 to type2 cables.
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