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Per the manual:

Drive moderately during the first 300 miles (500 km). After the initial 60 miles (100 km), speeds up to 50 or55 mph (80 or 90 km/h) are desirable.

What does "After the initial 60 miles (100 km), speeds up to 50 or55 mph (80 or 90 km/h) are desirable" mean? Are you supposed to stay below 50 mph for the first 60 miles?
 

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Hi

I'm guessing maybe they mean "acceptable" instead of "desirable".

For my car I tried to drive not too fast for the 1st 60 miles, and then only up to about 50-55 for the next few hundred (I think I actually didn't break 60 till I had about 500 - 600 miles or so but that was mostly just because the speed limit on the roads I drove before then where 55 or less.

Regards

Pat
 

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its in the manual somewhere, its been posted on here, break in is 500 miles without flooring it off the line though it does say a few good pulls actually helps with break in.
 

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its in the manual somewhere, its been posted on here, break in is 500 miles without flooring it off the line though it does say a few good pulls actually helps with break in.
Yup, driving the Fiat 500 hard, sending it into the higher rev's will help with breaking it in. As with any new car you have to do that.


Some think you have to go slow and take it easy for those first 500 KM's . What I have done before is do hard pulls every so often when the engine is at its peak running temperature.
 

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Hi

Here's a clip from one of the PDF versions of the Owner's Manuals on the Internet.



My take is that in high gear giving it some gas is a good thing, but its probably not a good thing in low gears.

Regards

Pat
 

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The large throttle opening (without lugging the engine) puts more than normal positive pressure on the piston ring pack, which is a good thing from a ring / cylinder bore seating perspective, in short duration stints. Backing off of the throttle after that activity allows the rings to flex back the 'other way', as well as cool off, preventing coking of oil around the ring lands and future ring sticking / oil consumption issues. I noted 'without lugging the engine' above ... by this, I mean don't try to pull too high a gear at too low a road speed (how's that for 'precise info' ?!?!), or you will highly stress both the crank bearings and the connecting rod big end bearings, leading to premature engine wear. Long story short, take it a bit easy for the first couple hundred miles, don't lug the engine, but also give it a number of short duration / large throttle opening acceleration bursts. Personally, I have elected to change oil ~ 2k miles, but that's just me ... this subject is a bit like delving into politics or religion. Many, many theories, seemingly without any two being fully identical!

Either way, have fun!!! :D
 

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What would you consider lugging the engine? I know that this is a small engine with quite a high red-line, so is lugging it driving below 2K RPMs? Or is it below 2.5K, or does it vary?
 

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The large throttle opening (without lugging the engine) puts more than normal positive pressure on the piston ring pack, which is a good thing from a ring / cylinder bore seating perspective, in short duration stints. Backing off of the throttle after that activity allows the rings to flex back the 'other way', as well as cool off, preventing coking of oil around the ring lands and future ring sticking / oil consumption issues. I noted 'without lugging the engine' above ... by this, I mean don't try to pull too high a gear at too low a road speed (how's that for 'precise info' ?!?!), or you will highly stress both the crank bearings and the connecting rod big end bearings, leading to premature engine wear. Long story short, take it a bit easy for the first couple hundred miles, don't lug the engine, but also give it a number of short duration / large throttle opening acceleration bursts. Personally, I have elected to change oil ~ 2k miles, but that's just me ... this subject is a bit like delving into politics or religion. Many, many theories, seemingly without any two being fully identical!

Either way, have fun!!! :D
einy, you my friend are a connoisseur of engine break-ins. You are correct, the rings should give as good as they get, constant rpm's do little good, whereas going up and down the rpm range (2 - 4000 rpms ) will allow the rings to flex, similar to sharpening a knife on a steel, 2 0r 3 times one side and once or twice on the other, yields a super sharp blade.

Rod stretch with high rpms will get you into uncharted territory and may cause a piston and ring to snag a honing mark which will break a edge off. The ideal scenario is to add rpms in increments of 500 as indicated above, 2 to 4, then 2500 to 4500, back to 2 to 4, a couple of times. Use the transmission and wheel speed to flex the whole drive train and engine. A standard will break in easier than an automatic because it is a more direct link than the fluid drive thru a auto gear box, but the auto will give you more latitude and will not be as harsh.

Remember, it not speed that breaks the engine in, its rpm. And, breakin does not stop at the engine, all components should be broken in.
 

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What would you consider lugging the engine? I know that this is a small engine with quite a high red-line, so is lugging it driving below 2K RPMs? Or is it below 2.5K, or does it vary?
Lugging the engine is considered to be driving in a gear where you can't accelerate easily and it bogs the engine down causing the throttle to be excessively open for the speed the engine is running. This condition will result in the fuel washing lubricating oils off of the pistons and combustion chamber walls which is know as 'dry spotting', hence, no lubrication, no slippage, equals premature wear or parts breakage.
 

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A lot of modern engines have the rings seated at the factory. So break in is more for the tranny and diff.

And unfortunately, the best break in for the engine is NOT good for a brand new tranny and diff.
 

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I think people tend to overthink break-in.

Don't baby the thing and don't beat on it with WOT drag race starts. That's what drive "moderately" means. I've got 175 miles on mine now and have had to redline once in third gear passing a van, and have done 80 MPH on the freeway in it. Otherwise, I've been shifting around 4K RPM after it's warmed up and driving pretty normally with a hard stab into the accelerator every block or so followed by engine braking back down to speed.
 
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