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My first oil change on my new Fiat 500 Sport was a two hour affair. In order to cut out the guesswork for other doityourselfers, here is a rundown of the procedure.
1. Remove plastic engine shroud. Just pull up on it and it will pop off at 4 attachment points on the top of the engine.
2. Remove the black airbox which is directly on top of the engine under the shroud. There are 3 silver 8mm bolts ( 2 at the sides and one in the back ) which attach the box directly to the engine. Loosen these until you can move the airbox assembly freely. There are 3 hoses which need to be detached from the airbox. One at the front on the right side which is accordianed and oval in shape, one which is on the top on the right and about 3/4" in diameter, and one which is on the right toward the back which is about 2" diameter and has an 8mm hose clamp on it. Detach all three at the airbox and lift the airbox up and place to the right side of the engine compartment. There will still be 2 flexible hoses attached at the rear of the airbox, but they will allow you to move the airbox freely to the right. This will give you room to access the oil filter canister which is located just behind the radiator on the left side.
3. Jack up the car on the left side front to give you room to crawl under the vehicle for removal of the plastic belly pan.
4. Remove the plastic belly pan under the engine by removing the 6 silver bolts. There are two at the front, two at the sides, and two at the back. Pull the pan back to unclip it from the lip on the leading edge, and it will fall right down so you can get it out of your way.
5. You will now see the oil pan and 13mm drain plug which is rear facing and directly above the metal strut which braces the frame from side to side. Remove the drain plug and drain the oil.
6. Locate the oil filter canister which is directly behind the radiator on the left side of the engine compartment. It is surrounded by a molded shield on its upper right. You access it from the top, and not underneath the car. It is a black domed plastic piece with a 27mm hex extension in the center. Use a 27mm socket with a 6" ratchet handle and loosen the cap of the canister. This is tricky since there is very little room and a hose in the way. The cap may be tight from the factory, but just keep turning to the left and unthread it all the way until it can be removed. The filter element snaps in to the cap, so it will not fall out while removing the cap. Remove the filter element by pulling firmly on it until it snaps out. Install the new one so it snaps in to the cap. Replace the rubber O ring on the outer edge of the cap and lube with oil. Install the cap and new filter and thread it down until you feel the threads end. Do not over tighten since it is a plastic part.
7. Install the 13mm drain plug in the oil pan.
8. Install the plastic belly pan with 6 bolts and lower the car from the jack.
9. Install airbox by reattaching hoses and carefully threading in the three 8mm silver bolts.
10. Add 4.0 quarts of 5-30 oil. Start car to circulate new oil. Check dip stick for oil level.
11. Snap on plastic engine shroud.
Hopefully this will decrease the time to perform the oil change to about 45 minutes for those of you who want to do it yourself, or believe that oil should be replaced more often than the factory recommended 8,000 mile intervals.
 

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When I look behind the radiator I can see a plastic cap marked Purolex that could hold a canister filter. It is on the right side of the engine not the left. The right side is the passenger side in the US. I have not removed the filer but in my car I should be able to reach it easily with a long extension and swivel (or swivels)without removing any panels or air cleaner.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
When I look behind the radiator I can see a plastic cap marked Purolex that could hold a canister filter. It is on the right side of the engine not the left. The right side is the passenger side in the US. I have not removed the filer but in my car I should be able to reach it easily with a long extension and swivel (or swivels)without removing any panels or air cleaner.
You are correct on the position of the filter canister. When I said "left side" I am referring to its placement when you are standing in front of the engine compartment to do the work. That would be your left side from that aspect.
You may be able to get to the filter canister with a long extension and swivel, but be aware that you probably will have a hard time fishing it out unless you remove the air filter. You also have to consider that the canister is plastic, and using a swivel may tend to damage the 27mm hex head. The other issue is the massive size of a 27mm socket, as this adds a lot of length to your wrench, so you may not be able to fit it AND a swivel in the small area.
 

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How do you remove the service light?
I had read elsewhere it's much like the method for turning off the service light on Dodges and Chryslers.


Turn ignition to on...but do not start.

Press gas pedal to floor 3 times.


Turn ignition off.


Done.
 

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I'm not too concerned about how to do an oil change since my maintenance is covered by FIAT for the 1st 36,000 miles.

after that, then I'll look up this thread. :p
 

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The right side is the passenger side in the US.
FYI...the "right side" is ALWAYS the 'right side', regardless of what country or if it's left hand drive or right hand drive.

the 'side' of the car is always determined as you sit IN the car. so regardless if you're in the drivers seat or passenger seat, the 'right is right and left is left'. :)
 

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I guess I'll be changing my own oil since we don't get free maintenance and oil changes in Canada. Also our standard warranty isn't as good.

<_<
 

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supporting the car

Nicely written.

But one should never be under a car merely supported by a jack. Use jack stands, or ramps.

MikeR
 

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Thanks 500 Wrench. Good outline, of the procedure. Some one else posted photo's on how to do a oil change. Saw it someplace. I'm glad I get mine done free for the next 36,000 miles.
 

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My first oil change on my new Fiat 500 Sport was a two hour affair. In order to cut out the guesswork for other doityourselfers, here is a rundown of the procedure.
1. Remove plastic engine shroud. Just pull up on it and it will pop off at 4 attachment points on the top of the engine.
2. Remove the black airbox which is directly on top of the engine under the shroud. There are 3 silver 8mm bolts ( 2 at the sides and one in the back ) which attach the box directly to the engine. Loosen these until you can move the airbox assembly freely. There are 3 hoses which need to be detached from the airbox. One at the front on the right side which is accordianed and oval in shape, one which is on the top on the right and about 3/4" in diameter, and one which is on the right toward the back which is about 2" diameter and has an 8mm hose clamp on it. Detach all three at the airbox and lift the airbox up and place to the right side of the engine compartment. There will still be 2 flexible hoses attached at the rear of the airbox, but they will allow you to move the airbox freely to the right. This will give you room to access the oil filter canister which is located just behind the radiator on the left side.
3. Jack up the car on the left side front to give you room to crawl under the vehicle for removal of the plastic belly pan.
4. Remove the plastic belly pan under the engine by removing the 6 silver bolts. There are two at the front, two at the sides, and two at the back. Pull the pan back to unclip it from the lip on the leading edge, and it will fall right down so you can get it out of your way.
5. You will now see the oil pan and 13mm drain plug which is rear facing and directly above the metal strut which braces the frame from side to side. Remove the drain plug and drain the oil.
6. Locate the oil filter canister which is directly behind the radiator on the left side of the engine compartment. It is surrounded by a molded shield on its upper right. You access it from the top, and not underneath the car. It is a black domed plastic piece with a 27mm hex extension in the center. Use a 27mm socket with a 6" ratchet handle and loosen the cap of the canister. This is tricky since there is very little room and a hose in the way. The cap may be tight from the factory, but just keep turning to the left and unthread it all the way until it can be removed. The filter element snaps in to the cap, so it will not fall out while removing the cap. Remove the filter element by pulling firmly on it until it snaps out. Install the new one so it snaps in to the cap. Replace the rubber O ring on the outer edge of the cap and lube with oil. Install the cap and new filter and thread it down until you feel the threads end. Do not over tighten since it is a plastic part.
7. Install the 13mm drain plug in the oil pan.
8. Install the plastic belly pan with 6 bolts and lower the car from the jack.
9. Install airbox by reattaching hoses and carefully threading in the three 8mm silver bolts.
10. Add 4.0 quarts of 5-30 oil. Start car to circulate new oil. Check dip stick for oil level.
11. Snap on plastic engine shroud.
Hopefully this will decrease the time to perform the oil change to about 45 minutes for those of you who want to do it yourself, or believe that oil should be replaced more often than the factory recommended 8,000 mile intervals.
Thanks for taking the time to write this out. I did the job but used a couple of shortcuts.
I have a tool that removes the oil from the sump through the dipstick tube. It is a common way that shops use to do oil changes from the top and makes the job fast and avoids the need to remove the drainplug and related other parts. You thread an attachment down the dipstick tube and connect it to the vacuum evacuation tool. It pulls the oil out fast and can be used when the oil is very hot. There are a few brands of these tools. I use one that is offered by Northern Tool, but there are many of others, MightyVac and others.
I removed the oil filter housing by connecting a half inch drive 27mm socket to a U-joint and a stubby, small drive ratchet. It is very tight in there but the housing has a clip that keeps it connected to the socket.
On our vehicle I could not pull the housing out without disconnecting mounts for the A/C rigid pipe, or going through the removal of all of the airbox parts. I got it loose and I flipped it around in the space just above where it is screwed in, removed the filter and replaced it with a new one and rotated it back into it's location, and tightened it down. A little tricky, but it is possible to do. Just wear protective disposable gloves and be careful and avoid getting dirt in the housing.
I did this first service at 1400 miles to get that first oil out of there and replace the filter after initial break it use. I found quite a few small particles of alloy trapped in the filter and other tiny things trapped in the pleats of the media. When I have rebuilt motors I have used the same strategy of an early oil change to get any residue of the build process out of there. Around $25 for oil and filter seems like a little amount of money to spend to help the motor start a long life. Four quarts and a filter.
-Dai
 

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On our vehicle I could not pull the housing out without disconnecting mounts for the A/C rigid pipe, or going through the removal of all of the airbox parts. I got it loose and I flipped it around in the space just above where it is screwed in, removed the filter and replaced it with a new one and rotated it back into it's location, and tightened it down. A little tricky, but it is possible to do. Just wear protective disposable gloves and be careful and avoid getting dirt in the housing.
-Dai
Lumos - great suggestion for flipping the filter housing over. The Service Tech at our Fiat Studio uses the same technique for 500's w/ Automatic transmission. Flipping the filter canister over, remove the filter element and gasket, and then replace / return. All from the top w/o removing the air filter housing.

On Standard Transmission 500's, the tech went in through the bottom. It appears the standard transmission Fiat 500 engine sits back about 1 inch more than an automatic giving more room.
 

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Lumos - great suggestion for flipping the filter housing over. The Service Tech at our Fiat Studio uses the same technique for 500's w/ Automatic transmission. Flipping the filter canister over, remove the filter element and gasket, and then replace / return. All from the top w/o removing the air filter housing.

On Standard Transmission 500's, the tech went in through the bottom. It appears the standard transmission Fiat 500 engine sits back about 1 inch more than an automatic giving more room.
Ours is a 5 speed manual and there is not much room at all. I think without a vehicle lift this is a good technique. It makes it a comfortable 30 minute job.

-Dai
 

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Changing the oi is a waste of time, let the dealer handle it.
Agreed. If the dealer forgets to tighten the drain plug, they pay. Believe me, I've seen it happen on both ends.
 
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