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Discussion Starter #1
Unplugged my charger at work yesterday and i saw this was the plug end itself was very hot, what could be causing this? I mean it still works but I don’t want it catching fire or something.

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It looks to me like you need a new plug. It's unfortunate because plug melting is reportedly avoidable by letting the car cool a bit before plugging in, & when you replace it with a melt-proof one you lose the original water-proof capacity of that part, & water can leak into the sealed plastic box through the wall-plug end of the cord.

I wish you had read my spreadsheet before this happened to you: 500e Top Tips & Tricks 2013 - 2019
 

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That can be caused by a bad plug or a bad outlet. The outlet itself can get too hot and heat up the plug by extension.
Your comment about only the plug end getting hot implies to me that the outlet it is plugged into is at fault. Is that being plugged into an extension cable at your work or directly into an outlet?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It looks to me like you need a new plug. It's unfortunate because plug melting is reportedly avoidable by letting the car cool a bit before plugging in, & when you replace it with a melt-proof one you lose the original water-proof capacity of that part, & water can leak into the sealed plastic box through the wall-plug end of the cord.

I wish you had read my spreadsheet before this happened to you: 500e Top Tips & Tricks 2013 - 2019
I did read that spreadsheet however that’s not the case my outlet is not getting hot it’s the actual plug itself and this is a commercial grade outlet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That can be caused by a bad plug or a bad outlet. The outlet itself can get too hot and heat up the plug by extension.
Your comment about only the plug end getting hot implies to me that the outlet it is plugged into is at fault. Is that being plugged into an extension cable at your work or directly into an outlet?
I do not use extension cables I don’t really need one because the outlet is so close to the car. At the time I saw this was plugged into the shop stall outlet the same one they plug in 2000 watt heaters into so it’s not a matter of crappie outlets it’s all commercial grade I never had this issue at home outlet and that one is a run of the mill outlet shared by the garage refrigerator.
 

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I do not use extension cables I don’t really need one because the outlet is so close to the car. At the time I saw this was plugged into the shop stall outlet the same one they plug in 2000 watt heaters into so it’s not a matter of crappie outlets it’s all commercial grade I never had this issue at home outlet and that one is a run of the mill outlet shared by the garage refrigerator.
Weird that it would just suddenly fail like that.
Well you can chop the end off and re-terminate it. Home Depot or Lowe's will sell you a new 20A rated plug for 5 bucks or less around here. They have water proof ones for a little more. If you want to make it really water proof a little silicone grease goes a long way around the clamps and seams.
 

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I did read that spreadsheet however that’s not the case my outlet is not getting hot it’s the actual plug itself and this is a commercial grade outlet.
Right, as per my spreadsheet, even with a high-grade outlet, the PLUG can still get hot, & the only suggestion (from a hot-climate user) is to let the car cool a bit before plugging in.

YOU won't need to worry about that now that you have to install a higher-grade PLUG, HOWEVER you WILL need to allow for the fact that the plug itself will no longer be waterproof (although maybe you could seal it with silicone).
 

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LOL! Great minds?... Anyway, unfortunately it's not all that "weird". The plug itself is a weak link in the system. Many users report heat, & a few have reported melting, which may not ALWAYS be prevented by waiting for the car to cool.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
LOL! Great minds?... Anyway, unfortunately it's not all that "weird". The plug itself is a weak link in the system. Many users report heat, & a few have reported melting, which may not ALWAYS be prevented by waiting for the car to cool.
Pardon my ignorance but what is the car cooling down have anything to do with the wallplug? Does the car pool more current when it’s in a warmed up state or what?
if I have to gander I guess I’m gonna say that there’s a little bit of corrosion in the outlet causing a little bit of electrical resistance hence why it caused it to get hot because it felt a little rusty/rough when I was pushing the connector in but the EVSE unit it self lit up and showing all systems go.
 

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I can't see any ratings on my own plug, but I suspect that it's rated for 12A, which might be okay for a 12A vacuum or microwave that's not being used continuously for hours, but in reality it's sometimes slightly insufficient for our own real-world use.
 

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Pardon my ignorance but what is the car cooling down have anything to do with the wallplug? Does the car pool more current when it’s in a warmed up state or what?
if I have to gander I guess I’m gonna say that there’s a little bit of corrosion in the outlet causing a little bit of electrical resistance hence why it caused it to get hot because it felt a little rusty/rough when I was pushing the connector in but the EVSE unit it self lit up and showing all systems go.
The culprit is likely the corrosion you referenced.
I haven't noticed mine drawing any more current when warm, but if the cable itself was warm that could need to cool down?
 

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Are you measuring current on L1?

The user who reported that letting the car cool prevented melting was somewhere hot (AZ I think). They had 2 or 3 500e's, had melted 1 or more stock plugs, & had prevented melting others by letting the cars rest a bit before plugging in.

The battery is more efficient at higher temperatures. You can get the exact same range when it's hot out, even when you add the draw of A/C power. Maybe when charging warm on L1 the battery also draws a bit more current. As I said, the plug seems to be barely sufficient most of the time, so it wouldn't take much to take it over the edge.

Turboz: You might show someone your melted plug, & ask if you can replace the outlet before the same thing (or worse, like a fire) happens to their own equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I’ve heard mostly in the electric car world that when the car is warm or hot it charges slower which is why when you go to DC fast chargers on some cars it doesn’t always go full speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Are you measuring current on L1?

The user who reported that letting the car cool prevented melting was somewhere hot (AZ I think). They had 2 or 3 500e's, had melted 1 or more stock plugs, & had prevented melting others by letting the cars rest a bit before plugging in.

The battery is more efficient at higher temperatures. You can get the exact same range when it's hot out, even when you add the draw of A/C power. Maybe when charging warm on L1 the battery also draws a bit more current. As I said, the plug seems to be barely sufficient most of the time, so it wouldn't take much to take it over the edge.

Turboz: You might show someone your melted plug, & ask if you can replace the outlet before the same thing (or worse, like a fire) happens to their own equipment.
I’m not showing nobody my melted plug I’m not supposed to be sucking free electricity out of here. I will get the talk if they found out I was charging my car in one of the bays 😂.
 

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Okay, so replace your plug & it will probably be fine. If not, then try to find another outlet. Backup plan, work on 240V for your stock chargecord at home. If that's a future option, you might want to put a 240 plug on the chargecord, & make a 120V adapter.

Li-ion batteries need to charge slower when really hot OR really cold, so there is likely an ideal middle temp, which could be right around the temp during driving.

DC charging speed is limited by the public charger & the car's onboard charger, whichever is lower. It also tapers down (sometimes below L2 speed) once it gets to around 80% SOC. All of that regardless of temp.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Okay, so replace your plug & it will probably be fine. If not, then try to find another outlet. Backup plan, work on 240V for your stock chargecord at home. If that's a future option, you might want to put a 240 plug on the chargecord, & make a 120V adapter.

Li-ion batteries need to charge slower when really hot OR really cold, so there is likely an ideal middle temp, which could be right around the temp during driving.

DC charging speed is limited by the public charger & the car's onboard charger, whichever is lower. It also tapers down (sometimes below L2 speed) once it gets to around 80% SOC. All of that regardless of temp.
Is the stock charger rated to handle 240v? I thought 240v uses like a nema 14-50?
 

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In your case, since you already have to replace your plug, I'm suggesting you could put a 240V plug on the charger, & make your own 120V adapter.

That's less prone to user-error, than the store-bought adapter that lets you set fire to most 120V items by plugging them into 240.
 

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this is a CHARGER issue, NOT a car issue.
The CHARGER tells the car how much it can supply, and the car pulls up to that amount of current.

Corrosion creates resistance, which will create heat. Likely the plug is corroded, or, just was providing too much amperage for too long and the heat built up and melted the plug end.
 
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